Updated : 17/12/2018
 
Science

Daily Telegraph
17/12/2018 06:47:15 AM
Feed of articlesMy Feed
Work at The Telegraph
Subscribe - 30 days free
School software could use webcams to spy on children as young as five 
Watchdogs close in on Silicon Valley giants as monopoly concerns mount
Blippar investor dispute to go down to the wire as company seeks emergency funding
The tech founders who cannot bear to let go of their baby
Alzheimer's Disease
School software could use webcams to spy on children as young as five 
From 'complete failure' to boss of Expedia: Mark Okerstrom on being a travel tycoon
New boss of British microchip firm Imagination was fired from previous job for misconduct
Comment: The splinternet: is this the end of the world wide web?
School software could use webcams to spy on children as young as five 
Watchdogs close in on Silicon Valley giants as monopoly concerns mount
Blippar investor dispute to go down to the wire as company seeks emergency funding
The tech founders who cannot bear to let go of their baby
MPs call on Parliament to investigate dangers Huawei poses to the UK's national infrastructure
Christmas shoppers to be targeted by facial recognition technology in London's West End
Gallery: New Resident Evil 2 Remake screenshots show horror of modern update
Gallery: Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Lumix People's Choice Award
Gallery: Piggyback riders: Funny photos of lazy hitchhiking animals
The Mighty Girl effect: why fathering a daughter protects men against sexism
Alzheimer’s could be triggered by medical procedures, study suggests
Why 10pm on Christmas Eve (or Christmas Day) could be deadly 
Was Stonehenge built by cow power? Study suggests Neolithic farmers had mastered animal traction 
Glass-a-day drinkers less likely than teetotallers to end up in hospital 
First lab-grown steak unveiled as scientists say it will be available to buy within two years
Why the lord of the manor wants to start growing cannabis
Peter O’Reilly, doyen of Irish fly fishing who popularised the sport in a series of bestselling books – obituary
Common crane enjoys best year in UK since 17th Century, RSPB says 
Comment: We need more magic beans to help us offset the effects of climate change
Gas solutions: developing innovative new technologies
Downloading films to your devices – everything you need to know
An engineering group with an army of fans
Electric vans gathering pace
Terms and Conditions
adblocking instructions


Scientific American
17/12/2018 06:46:37 AM
Could Medical Procedures Transmit Alzheimer's?
How the Brain's Face Code Might Unlock the Mysteries of Perception
A Math Function Describes How Whole Societies Remember—and Forget
"Spy" Virus Eavesdrops on Bacteria, Then Obliterates Them
Could Medical Procedures Transmit Alzheimer's?
How the Brain's Face Code Might Unlock the Mysteries of Perception
A Math Function Describes How Whole Societies Remember—and Forget
Experts Urge U.S. to Continue Support for Nuclear Fusion Research
A New Connection between the Gut and Brain

BBC
17/12/2018 06:47:22 AM
Tomorrow's World
Family & Education
Entertainment & Arts
Climate deal to bring Paris pact to life
Science & Environment
Five things we've learnt
Where we are in seven charts
What is climate change?
Full article Climate deal to bring Paris pact to life
What chance of finding life on Mars?
Science & Environment
Full article What chance of finding life on Mars?
Coffee or chocolate: How green is your diet?
Full article Coffee or chocolate: How green is your diet?
'Miracle' six-day-old baby survives Ebola

New Scientist
17/12/2018 06:47:15 AM
THE DAILY NEWSLETTER
Sign up to our daily email newsletter
Log in with facebook
Log in with google
Activate subscription
Get increased access now
Manage your subscription here
Some people have slightly squashed heads thanks to Neanderthal DNA
Incredible shrinking 3D printer can make really tiny objects
We thought the Incas couldn't write. These knots change everything
When humans are wiped from Earth, the chicken bones will remain
Childhood hormone treatments may have spread Alzheimer’s proteins
Don't miss: a chance to play WiFI Wars and revisit the Apollo 8 days
Home Futures review – what living spaces teach us about our culture
The secret site in England where beavers control the landscape
Coal power emissions in the US are even higher than we thought
The disorientated ape: Why clever people can be terrible navigators
What should we do about plastic?
Sporting superheroes talk technology in sport with Clare Balding
Catherine Heymans: The dark side of the universe
Niamh Shaw: Simulating life on Mars
Richard Faragher: Can you live forever?
Incredible shrinking 3D printer can make really tiny objects
Childhood hormone treatments may have spread Alzheimer’s proteins
Some people have slightly squashed heads thanks to Neanderthal DNA
We've been using CRISPR for years - now we know how it really works
Australia's 'marsupial lion' was a meat-ripping, tree-climbing terror
Student subscriptions
Educational subscriptions
Corporate subscriptions


Nature
17/12/2018 06:46:50 AM
Skip to main content
How Neanderthal DNA might have shaped some human brains Gene variants acquired through interbreeding seem to give some people with European ancestry more elongated brains.
Italian scientists protest funding for vaccine-safety investigation The National Order of Biologists made a €10,000 donation to a group that questions the safety of vaccines.
The best science images of the year: 2018 in pictures California’s worst wildfires, cloned monkey twins, the world’s smallest house and more.
Global funding for tuberculosis research hits all-time high news | 12 Dec 2018
South Korean scientists protest treatment of university president accused of misusing funds news | 13 Dec 2018
Baby gene edits could affect a range of traits news | 12 Dec 2018
Pressure mounts on Iran over academic who faces death sentence news | 12 Dec 2018
Students need guidance in languages they speak Clarissa Rios Rojas world view | 11 Dec 2018
Podcast Extra: Evidence of a ‘transmissible’ Alzheimer’s protein New research suggests that a key protein involved in the neurodegenerative disease can be transferred between brains.
Podcast: The art of performing science, and chiral chemistry Join Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell for this week's science updates.
China introduces ‘social’ punishments for scientific misconduct NEWS | 14 DEC 2018
South Korean university delays vote on whether to suspend president NEWS | 14 DEC 2018
Massive ocean carbon sink spotted burping CO2 on the sly NEWS | 14 DEC 2018
Huge brain study uncovers ‘buried’ genetic networks linked to mental illness NEWS | 13 DEC 2018
Debate ethics of embryo models from stem cells International discussion must guide research, urge Nicolas Rivron, Martin Pera and colleagues. comment
How one conference embraced diversity Improvements to an AI event accused of sexism are long overdue.
Wanted: a fair carbon tax Unrest in France at a rise in fuel prices highlights how the necessary transition to a clean economy must be carefully managed.
Aaron Klug (1926-2018) obituary
Maths shows how we lose interest editorial
2018: Choice cuts from this year’s News & Views articles news and views
An exciting tool for asymmetric synthesis news and views
From the archive news and views
All for one and one for all to fight flu news and views
Meet the supervisors who helped to shape four scientists’ careers Knowing when to hand-hold and when to step back is crucial for helping early-career researchers.
Juggling research and family life: h?onest reflections from scientist dads Five fathers describe how they and their partners combine parenting and careers.
Conference attendance boosts authorship opportunities career news
International students steer clear of graduate programmes in the United States career news
Science in hand: how art and craft can boost reproducibility Artists and performers inform the physical act of experimentation — Roger Kneebone, Claudia Schlegel and Alan Spivey explore.
Love, death and CRISPR: an artwork A collaboration between geneticists and an artist invites us through the looking glass into a speculative future, finds Anna Kriebs.
The Wright brothers’ real story, cosmic chronology, and what happened to the megafauna: Books in brief books and arts
India: a turbulent tale of rivers, floods and monsoons books and arts
Nature Communications
Scientific Community & Society
Earth & Environmental Sciences
Authors & Referees
About Nature Research
Explore articles by subject
Reprints & permissions
Nature Masterclasses
Nature Research Academies
Librarian service & tools
Partnerships & Services
Accessibility statement
Terms & Conditions